Buzzing bees (and my excuses for killing some)

Buzzing bees (and my excuses for killing some)

Today was around 21 degrees celsius and mostly sunny.   It has been very hot just after Christmas getting above 30 degrees celsius   and then cooler,  misty, rainy for a few days.  Today was however perfect so I did a follow up inspection to one a couple of weeks ago when I was concerned about the wax moth larvae I found.    Thankfully I saw absolutely no evidence of anything this time.    The inspection went well.   I found the queen, and most importantly I found babies.   Meaning the queen has been laying as recently as 3 to 7 days ago.   There seem to be even more bees than 2 weeks ago.  They are relatively calm, and get a little bit more buzzy – more agitated about 5 minutes in.   I think I squished a few this time – which is just a horrible feeling – and I try incredibly hard not to – but it’s sometimes just impossible to not.   There are so many more now – and it’s getting harder for them to get out of the way.   But I am very slow and gentle and use my bee brush at all times.  Excuses probably to make me feel better.   My last inspection was on Christmas eve.   At that stage my two outer frames (the ones that had new foundation as of November) were inspected.  #1 frame (that is the one closest to me from the side I always stand) there were quite a few bees starting to make cells.  However on #8 frame (the one furthest from me as I stand) had nothing going on.    But this time #1 had lots of activity – babies, capped cells,  and # 8 had bees building cells.  – Both of which you can see in the pictures.   #8 is particularly magical.  It’s backlit by the sun and you can see clearly the cells being built on the wax foundation.    I still can’t for the life of me see any capped honey – but I could be staring right at it an not realise!  They all look like capped brood cells to me.    There were a lot more bees that were in the flow frames.   I have a photo below which shows the very beginning of the bees starting to fill in the gaps of the flow frame cells, I would assume getting them ready to start putting honey in.     As always – if any of my assumptions need to be corrected I would appreciate an email or a comment.    🙂

 

 

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